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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/23/2021 in all areas

  1. I would not pass up he opportunity to fly coast to coast and back. Will you ever get the opportunity to do it again ???
    4 points
  2. I think it is all the photo's of Chris's harem. They are large files to say the least
    3 points
  3. maybe its just me but I hate this new forum style. I find myself coming here less and less. Why did this new format/style happen and are there any advantages to it I am not seeing?
    2 points
  4. and the standard remove the scat tube on the muffler shroud and look for signs of leaks. borescope is your friend here.
    2 points
  5. Insuring oneself requires walking somewhat of a fine line. We can all insure ourselves into the poorhouse. I agree that in order to avoid that the insured has to accept some reasonable degree of risk. But it should be reasonable. The person who has a net worth of 5 million is not wise to insure with a 100k sublimit. If your wife or your child was catastrophically injured or killed by a driver with that type of net worth but foolishly driving around with state minimum coverage of 25k I highly doubt you would authorize your lawyer to settle the matter for that 25k policy limit.
    2 points
  6. That makes absolutely no sense to me, unless a "pin" is installed somewhere that prevents the landing gear from retracting at all. AD 75-23-04 makes Mooney Service Bulletin M20-190 mandatory. That SB requires removing and inspecting the landing gear actuator for worn internal gears. There is no "pin" involved, and I'm extremely skeptical that AD 75-23-04 is actually N/A to your airplane. Strongly suggest you have your mechanic research the AD and SB in detail.
    2 points
  7. A guy in our M20J club accidentally broke the Autopilot Disconnect/Trip Interrupt switch for out King Autopilot 200. The switch C2003R is handled by Textron and sells for $99.95 each. Unfortunately the switches were backordered until mid-August and I am leaving on a cross-country trip to California next Friday. Many thanks go out to Bob Weber at webairconsulting.com 616 822 1999 for helping our mechanic figure out how to get a replacement switch. Even though Bob didn't have a switch, he helped us find one. The good thing is we have replaced the switch. The bad thing is that we had to pay $360 for it (without labor).
    2 points
  8. I have been told there was a tubing thickness change also by a Mooney engineer.
    2 points
  9. I posted this Monday. It got lost in transfer to new web host. Since this plane was "seats full" many comments here assume it was "over gross" inferring that is the cause of the accident. But Max Gross is just a number that some engineer picked as a compromise that may or may not reflect a true threshold for safe operation. The FAA Weight & Balance Handbook (FAA-H-8083-1B) states "The designers of an aircraft set the maximum weight based on the amount of lift the wings or rotors can provide under the operational conditions for which the aircraft is designed. The structural strength of the aircraft also limits the maximum weight the aircraft can safely carry. The designers carefully determine the ideal center of gravity (CG) and calculate the maximum allowable deviation from this specific location." This accident J model was serial number 24-0744 with a MGW of 2,740 lbs. But in 1990 Mooney engineers decided that J models with serial number 24-3201 and up could increase the MGW to 2,900 lbs. The only difference between the accident plane and the later planes was the plastic curved wingitps. And those same engineers decided that all J models back to serial number 24-1686 could magically increase to 2,900 lbs. for only the cost of a piece of paper (Special Letter SL-92-1). And then in 1994 Rocket Engineering strapped an IO-550 on a J model taking the MGW originally to 2,997 lbs (one bracket from a K model was added to the side of the frame to support the heavy Continental). And then in 1997 Rocket magically increased the MGW to 3,200 lbs. without any modification other than a piece of paper. And consider that the Ovation and Eagle have the same wings (and flaps and ailerons) and steel cage as the J (with another foot of aluminum in the baggage compartment and basically the same empennage) taking the MGW to 3,374. And we have people practically wetting themselves here on MS hoping for a 400-500 lbs. increase from Mooney taking them to 3,600-3,800 lbs. Clearly there are limitations on wing loading and power loading. Modern Mooney's have the strongest wings in the industry. The same wing and steel frame will support 2,740 lbs. as well as 3,600+ lbs. Wing loading is not the limitation. (this in not a Piper). The landing gear are the limitation on load. Yes the controls will become more heavy and you need to pay attention to speed in banking and landing. I fly my modified J (Missile) frequently seats filled and at 3,200 MGW. I owned and flew it before the mod and quite frankly I don't notice much difference in handling before vs. after the mod. Power loading is another matter. As you fill each seat or fuel tanks in the J the power loading grows detrimentally. Rate of climb deteriorates as well as acceleration and speed. Take off rolls are longer. The decline in performance is a continuum and not a cliff at the "MGW". Ferry pilots take off over gross all the time. Charles Lindberg did it. You have to carefully manage converting forward energy into lift with slow shallow climbs. You cannot get uncomfortable and jerk the nose up. You have to be patient. If you have a long enough runway without obstructions you can become airborne safely. But the margin of safety narrows. And this may understandably make many here feel very panicky. Hence Rocket and Mooney bumped the power with the big Continental 6's to 280, 300 and 310 HP improving power loading and allowing the MGW to comfortably increase. Flying has a higher risk than many other activities and flying safely is about managing those risks. Think about this. Suppose Pilot A owns Mooney 24-1685 and Pilot B owns Mooney 24-1686. The planes are identical in every physical way and they are going to fly together. Pilot A is limited to a MGW of 2,740 lbs. Pilot B bought the SL-92-1 so he has a MGW of 2,900 lbs. Assume both planes load up to 2,900 lbs with passengers, luggage and fuel to fly to their destination. Is Pilot A really flying "less safe" than Pilot B? If Pilot A had an accident on the way would we be as critical of him as some of the comments about the deceased pilot are here? My point is "over gross" alone did not cause this crash. This was not an inflight break-up or loss of a wing. N4474H looked pristine and I think I see a Powerflow exhaust on it. Previous comments said the owner put a Scimitar prop on it. About 21 pics of his really great looking J that you can page thru showing before paint/upgrades and after: Aircraft N4474H (1978 Mooney M20J 201 C/N 24-0744) Photo by Doug Robertson (Photo ID: AC1505766) (airport-data.com) I personally don't know anything about the deceased pilot or his flying history. FAA Airman says he was Commercial SEL and Instrument. Maybe it was something as simple as just not making full power at max weight combined with limited margins to safely clear obstacles. Perhaps something more severe such as he lost the engine or even suffered a health event at the worst possible time. But let's give him the benefit of an open mind regarding this tragic outcome.
    2 points
  10. The cross county was supposed to be clear sky today - Oof! I wondered as I had about 2 miles visibility (down at an angle from 7,000 feet) if is was due to wild fires far, far way. Over Illinois and Indiana, it was flying in milk.
    2 points
  11. You obviously have electric gear. It indicates that you are overdriving the actuator. You need to have someone who understands the Mooney gear get it set up right.
    2 points
  12. The bracket on the airframe which your gear actuator mounts to, is in turn mounted to the floor pan directly under the pilot's seat. As the gear goes over center, compression of the springs in the system cause the rods to compress against the actuator on both the fore (nose gear) and aft (main gear) ends. This compression, combined with the aluminum floor pan not being perfectly rigid, will cause a "bump" under your butt in the left seat. Our 1976 M20F has consistently done this for the last 16 years, through numerous gear rigging checks, with no long-term ill effects. I've come to think of it as an additional "gear is down and locked" indicator. When I put the gear down, in addition to looking for the green light on the panel and checking the floor indicator alignment bars, I expect to feel a kick in the butt. On edit: if your log books indicate recent completion of Mooney Service Bulletin M20-190 (the AD that @Ron McBride refers to), I would not do anything at this time. If there is no record of this inspection being done recently, then yes, you ought to have the gear actuator checked out. But that is true independent of the "bump in the butt" observation. For further info, see https://www.donmaxwell.com/ad-75-23-04-sb-m20-190
    2 points
  13. Careful. The OP didn't say he had a "PC" system. He said he had a Brittain B6. That is a three-axis Brittain autopilot capable of nav tracking and altitude hold. In addition to the T&B and servos everyone correctly describes as simple, the B6 also has a control head unit full of electronics (not modern ones) with a complex rotary mode switch, as well as a complex altitude control unit, and the associated vacuum switches and relays required to make it work. Our own @211º has been through the Brittain saga, and was kind enough to collect a bunch of information from a bunch of different sources, and organize it at https://www.windfield.farm/brittain-autopilot. It's the best reference I know of on this class of Brittain autopilot. TLDR summary: it is feasible - if a little gray from a legal perspective - to patch cracked vacuum lines, re-seal servo boots, etc. But if there's an issue with the control head unit or the altitude control box, you're effectively out of luck. It is extremely difficult to get service for these modules, and any service you could actually get is one-hundred-percent not legal. Only Brittain holds the legal authority to do this work, and they're not taking any customers.
    2 points
  14. Just watched Dr. Scott’s YT weather presentation for the day… -a-
    2 points
  15. This is false. Depending on the policy language, yes, the attorney (and carrier) is obligated to defend the Insured until settlement or judgement or award is reached. Generally speaking, the duty to defend outweighs the duty to indemnify. The attorney hired on your behalf is more obligated to the Insured than the carrier. As you highlighted, with the excess exposure, the carrier has no more exposure with respect to indemnity. That being the case, the attorney certainly has to work with the Insured more closely. At any time, an Insured can retain their own counsel at it's own expense. Conversely, if the loss can be settled within the policy limit, the Insured is rarely consulted. The defense attorney and carrier simply work through the matter with the plaintiffs, only bringing in the Insured when necessary. Remember, settlement negotiations are to avoid litigation. Once it goes to court, the ball is out of everyone's hands. In some cases, the cost of defense can be more than the policy limit/settlement made. The carrier has a duty to settle, or attempt to settle, the claimant's claims on behalf of the Insured within the policy limits. If the claim is obviously in excess of the limit, in most states, the carrier must immediately tender the limits in an "attempt" to settle.
    2 points
  16. I'm in Tempe, on the South side of Phoenix. If you are serious, we will have to wait a while. I have a 172 I have to get fixed up and I'm on the hook to get the 310 in my picture airworthy again, not to mention the Mooney can use some attention. I promised @Boilermonkey a gauge that I have to swap out of the Mooney this weekend. Not to mention that I have a day job who would love to have me work 60 hours a week.
    1 point
  17. I'm starting my annual next week. My plane has been near the ocean for 20+ years. My plane has been treated with ACF-50; it bleeds ACF-50. I'm not an expert; I'm not a mechanic; I'm not a materials engineer; but I wouldn't be surprised if the aluminum sheeting doesn't look similar on a lot of these airplanes. I have no idea what aged ALCLAD sheeting is expected to look like after decades. I'm going to look closely at mine soon though and discuss findings with my mechanic.
    1 point
  18. Electronically, this is true. Mechanically, the switch that engages the altitude hold is mounted in the BI-601 head unit. If the switch itself has an issue, repair will require opening the BI-601 unit for service. To my knowledge, only Brittain can legally do this, and they're not accepting work. I'm not trying to discourage the OP from working on their autopilot. It is certainly true that the B6 system consists of multiple sub-systems, and even just getting some of them to work is nice. We have a B-5 in our airplane, which was inop at the time of purchase. We got the wing-leveler (PC) component working fairly easily and quickly. Heading hold came later, though we never have gotten it to be quite as precise as we'd like. Nav tracking came even later, and we didn't get the altitude hold working until about 8 years into ownership.
    1 point
  19. SB 208 was issued to address a specific problem. If you didn't find corrosion there, it doesn't mean corrosion wouldn't be found elsewhere. What we are advocating is that due to what you showed us, I would proceed cautiously. The areas you need to be concerned with are not the easily accessible areas. It is in areas like the rear spar and other locations that you need to work to get a better view of. M20Doc and other IAs can give you an idea of where to look. As for IA opinions, I think IAs are like any other professions, you can ask 3 of them and get 3 different opinions. The one I trust is the one who understands the limits of when something is considered a problem.
    1 point
  20. Service bulletin 208 came out when it was discovered that water was seeping down from the Windows into the fiberglass surrounding the roll cage underneath them. Part of the SB is a visual inspection of the tubular structure. My shop pulls the panels and inspects them at the annual. My point was that if you don’t see the foil backed insulation, there is a good chance that the SB was never done (or at least correctly). As for the saltine cracker comment. Planes that spend time near the ocean are more likely to be exposed to sea spray. Unfortunately the inspection panels are not airtight and salt can enter the plane this way. I think you indicated this plane spent a good portion of its life near the ocean. If they didn’t treat it with Corrosion X, Boeshield or some other anti-corrosion treatment, what you are seeing is probably an indicator of other corrosion that you can’t see. I know you have a financial commitment (if not already an emotion one) to this plane. That’s a fair amount of corrosion in an area where you shouldn’t see much. As the Doc said, the skin is structural and I would be weary of assuming that it isn’t. I would be looking deeper into the fuselage and wings for further evidence of the extent of corrosion. Not trying tear down your enthusiasm. Rather just trying to avoid what we have seen here numerous times before. An owner posting on the site their plane is trash due to corrosion. Good luck with the decision. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    1 point
  21. Wow thank you for the great advice. I will do some troubleshooting and then report back!
    1 point
  22. That is correct. It's in the IPC if anyone wants the details.
    1 point
  23. I'm getting ads for my own company's products! What gives with that?! Also, I am seeing ads for "Depends" for large people. Wonder why that is happening?
    1 point
  24. My hangar neighbor has an M20A with the wooden wings, and there are no tie-down rings. He said you tie it down through the main landing gear. So that's always an option if you forget the tie-down rings.
    1 point
  25. But his transponder is on the way out. Might as well get a waas ads-b out (better yet In and out) transponder. It's not really that much more for the Garmin 375 which has a waas gps. ads-b in/out transponder all in one. https://buy.garmin.com/en-US/US/p/577174
    1 point
  26. BTW, my B6 was inop when I bought my 20E... through about 3 or 4 years and finding little things that needed tweaked and finding some geniuses on MS and working with my A&P, it works better and better. The moments when a little portion of the system come alive or begin to work will make you smile quite a bit.
    1 point
  27. Thanks for the reply. My buddy with a Bravo, don't know if he is on here, mentioned the drag wall. I figured higher would be better think I will see what I can get initially at 17000 and then back to LOP.
    1 point
  28. No, not as good as it gets. The Bravo was meant to be flown a lot higher than 10.5. I’ve done a high power setting at 19,000 for a few minutes as a test and got around 207-209 but the fuel flow was ridiculous to keep the TIT in a reasonable range (see pic below). Around 20k at 29/24 burning 18 gph I get about 200.
    1 point
  29. When that film separates it's time to replace the lens. It looks horrible without the film.
    1 point
  30. You only see the option on the desktop version of the site - and that looks like an iPad so it would be using the mobile version. It wouldn't help you on a tablet since the site is likely already using the full width of your screen. What areas have extra white space that you are referring to?
    1 point
  31. I was involved in a commercial real estate lawsuit. I ended up hiring an Attorney that specialed in Insurance law. The attorneys for my insurance company were not happy. Their tunes changed quickly, and they settled soon, well within policy limits. The money spent on our attorney was well spent keeping the insurance companies attorneys in line. Ron
    1 point
  32. Carusoam is correct. The $10 minimum donation will remove ads for only one year. As a side note it will not effect ads showing up via Tapatalk - those are from them and not us so I cannot make them go away. As for the new look I posted here on why we had to update the theme/style of the site. Personally I don't think it was that radical of a change...if you could be specific about what is worse now vs then that would help. Also mention what kind of device you are using the site on such as a phone, tablet, desktop, etc.
    1 point
  33. I don’t ever see any ads.
    1 point
  34. As much as I hate Garmin's closed system dominance of the certified avionics market, you gotta admire their innovation.
    1 point
  35. In mine there are holes in the floor from the footwell all the way back through the baggage compartment. The potential sources for CO entry are numerous.
    1 point
  36. PMA has zero to do with parts produced outside of the authorized processes, such as the cables McFarlane provides under the OPP process. McFarlane very carefully points this out in a disclaimer on the part spec when getting an OPP part that the part is "not FAA approved" and the purchaser's signature certifies "that if this part is to be installed on a type-certificated aircraft it will be installed in full compliance with one of the exceptions listed in 14 CFR 21.9(a)." When you get a cable from McFarlane with a Mooney part number you do not get that disclaimer, you get an order that says "McFarlane Aviation Products FAA-PMA Replacement Aircraft Parts", an invoice with a Certificate of Conformance citing quality clauses assuring approval, and a tag on the part that says "FAA-PMA". They are very different. An FAA-PMA does not apply to all parts produced by a manufacturer with a PMA authorization, and it is important to understand the distinction. A part sourced from McFarlane under OPP has the same status as one properly sourced from anywhere else under the OPP processes.
    1 point
  37. Here’s Lycoming’s recommendation for storage. Engine Preservation for Active and Stored Aircraft.pdf
    1 point
  38. That means diddly squat when buying a non-stock part from them without a Mooney part number. I've bought both OPP and proper P/N cables from them for my airplane and they're not made the same. I actually prefer the OPP ones.
    1 point
  39. Properly installed and configured, Primary ADI and Standby ADI/HSI or Standby ADI/MFD, the Standby would revert to an ADI if the Primary's breaker was pulled, or the mandatory revisionary switch was moved from Auto to ADI. It could also be done by rotating the big knob one click CCW.
    1 point
  40. I guess I should take my recently reproduced OPP up and down locks and throw them in the trash... This is nonsense. With all of the areas discussed regarding OPP to include McFarland and others how can anyone make such definitive statements. Also, does anyone have any data to show these are not acceptable parts as I have not heard anything that would make me think otherwise. On another note if someone wishes to go this direction and procures these parts I don't see how bashing the idea with no data supports the intent of this site.
    1 point
  41. I did. And I also asked for a separate sales contract for the extra equipment vs the airplane. Saved a tiny bit of that CA sales tax.
    1 point
  42. A number of Air Traffic Controllers I knew always told me that most Mooney’s have two radar echos. The first is the plane, then a few miles behind was the pilot. I’m sure they didn’t mean anyone here though! Clarence
    1 point
  43. One reason I like Garmin pilot. You save your load sheets and apply them to each flight to verify w&b for each flight. Some places I fly require a w&b submitted for each flight before release.
    1 point
  44. This is a great conversation for everyone headed to OSH this coming week. I have weights for my wife, daughter and myself. Don't tell the girls but I added 5lbs to all of our weights just to account for daily weight fluctuations. I also have a luggage scale and have weights for everything going in the plane. We will be shipping 50lbs of stuff to OSH. It all would have fit, although not comfortably for the rear seat passenger. But I wanted to carry 50 gal of fuel. I could have gone down to 40 gals, but that would have added an extra fuel stop to the trip in order to carry legal reserves. My home field is 3900 MSL with an 11,000 MSL MEA for eastbound IFR flights. Luckily, I have a 9000' runway.
    1 point
  45. I think it's good to remember that every airplane has it's own characteristics. I flew a friend's C last year. First time in a C in 25 years. First thing I noticed is that it was a lot harder (at least for me) to raise the Johnson bar gear from the left seat and that the airspeed builds quickly in the climb making it even more difficult. So, I went for the gear as soon as I was sure I was climbing. Second thing I noticed is that the CHTs went quickly over 400 unless I let the airplane accelerate, and the top of the white arc comes up quickly. So, immediately after gear I raised the flaps. The Beaver floatplane will not get off the water without takeoff flaps and will not climb well until the flaps are raised to climb. So the drill was takeoff with takeoff flaps and stay in ground effect accelerating to 80 mph while raising the flaps to climb and reducing the power to climb power. In the Cherokee (the best mannered airplane I have ever flown -- too bad they are so slow), I would take off with two notches of flap and reduce to one notch passing Vx and take off the last notch passing Vy. Skip
    1 point
  46. 231 here. Gear up as soon as I have a positive rate on the VSI, regardless of runway left. Flaps up when the gear is in the wells. Then pitch for midway between Vx and Vy to gain maximum altitude with minimum risk, as close to the airport as possible. Vx risks an inability to get the nose over in time if the engine quits. It is for performance takeoffs but not everyday takeoffs. Vy gains altitude too far from the airport to make it back if the engine quits. My initial climb in my aircraft is 85 KIAS. Getting the gear and flaps stowed helps to accelerate to that speed faster and allows a steeper climb at that speed. I use takeoff flaps for takeoff in my aircraft, that's half flaps.
    1 point
  47. So… While we are remembering the times we don’t want to repeat… Just remember…. The future is yours to adjust… Following Forbes is great if you are a Billionaire… Following Buffet is pretty good too on your way to being a billionaire… Charting the cost of living has been done before around here… no big magazine required… Search for Corvettes around here… there will be threads that outline the cost of a corvette back in the day…and what one costs today… I couldn’t afford a used Corvette back then, and today… it only comes after a few other things… priorities… There are also interesting threads around here regarding how people have actually paid for their Mooney… which go back about a decade or so… So… if we want to blame somebody else about why we can’t have nice things…. Go for it… unfortunately, it won’t change anything… there are people that can afford these planes…. See what they are doing that makes that possible… I have only owned two Mooneys… they were both owned by companies or people that ran a company initially… We can blame the fed too… that is pretty easy. They pull the punch bowl away every time they increase the interest rate 1/4 of a percent… Who said that the party is over? Don’t look that up, it isn’t required… it won’t help either… Pulling the punch bowl away only lasts a short period of time… the party continues on… It is a problem for individuals similar to when the fed lowered interest rates…. Nobody called it for what it was…. It is putting the punch bowl back out… for people who use the opportunity wisely… It takes time to save enough money to buy a plane…. Or… It takes time to pay off a plane loan… Get to know how interest affects everything…. Over time. Get to know how inflation affects everything… over time Get to know how to save… Get to know how to invest… Did you know… the calculation to determine how long it takes to double your money based on the interest rate your investment has? (The rule of 72) The S&P has gone up 10+% on average every year since before the Great Depression…. There are hints thrown in around here by how individuals do this… Know that there are experts in this field that are worth consulting with… In the 70s… I knew a guy…. He bought a boat… after a couple of years he bought a bigger boat because he ‘made’ money on the one he owned…. The bigger boat would earn him more… sounded good… Inflation was mixing up the logic the guy had… he wasn’t really earning money on the boat above the inflation rate that was taking the value away… In the end… he got tricked by inflation to spend more than he really wanted to… Keep both eyes open…. The rules don’t change…our understanding of the rules are what’s important… As far as an M20J being a low cost plane…. A handful of M20J-ATs were sold to universities…. Compare that to the cost of an M20S… the stripped down version of the M20R… Nearly the same number of parts… nearly the same number of hours to build… nearly as much complexity to manufacture… A few hundred more pounds of materials… a couple of more cylinders under the extended cowling…. Trim all you want…. There isn’t a way for Mooney to produce a decontented stripper into an affordable airplane… Affordable Mooneys are of the pre-flown variety… Affordability increases as your nest empties out… grow the children faster more efficiently…. Write a book about how you did it… do presentations on YouTube…. Gain followers. Strange stuff I learned about while reading MS endlessly… from other PPs… some had retirement planes, others ran their own businesses… Its not about the money… it’s what you do with it… that can make a difference… Life can be challenging… being part of a community can help… PP thoughts only, not a finance guy… Best regards, -a-
    1 point
  48. Every Mooney will fly over weight.... but none will fly without fuel.
    1 point
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