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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/04/2021 in all areas

  1. In my airplane, the PIC determines the mask policy. And at the moment, that means you'll be wearing a mask, regardless of your credentials. And if I'm in your airplane, I'll be wearing a mask out of courtesy to anyone on board. All of this will be behind us soon enough... but I'd like to still be around, with a valid medical, and flying an airplane, when it's all over.
    6 points
  2. FAR 91.213 is your guide. The answer is, as is often the case, “it depends.” An example: In the FIKI Ovation both alternators are required for flight into icing conditions. That requirement is not in a MEL or Kinds of Equipment list. It is found in the AFM supplement for the TKS system as part of the STC. Similar type question: Must the PIC sit in the left seat? Probably not for most Part 91 operations. But wait — the 2000 Ovation with a KFC225 autopilot has a requirement buried in the AFM autopilot supplement that the PIC must be in the left front seat.
    6 points
  3. Picked up a Bravo and finally started the meandering road back home. Broker snapped some shots as we were leaving. Great folks at Southwind at KFMY.
    5 points
  4. This would be right in line with my previous prediction. The AV-30's were approved once I gave up and within a week of me tearing apart my panel to put in the Dual G5's. My plane is scheduled to go in for the GFC500 on April 26th so expect the TruTrack to be approved within a few weeks of that date! You're welcome in advance.
    4 points
  5. SOP Having a bunch of ifs, ands, and buts can complicate things. If you pop your hand off the throttle and reach for the center bar out of routine and habit while flying wing during a formation flight, that can be critical. You haven't convinced me. Unusual procedures should not serve as a band aid for proper maintenance and checklist procedures. Maintain the seats properly. Check that it is locked before flight. Keep your hand on the controls and focus on flying. Those are my priorities. Be careful about that lousy seatback too.
    4 points
  6. Hi AH64pilot I'm the guy that wrote the Vz thesis that was referenced earlier in this thread. For 120 knots or so you will be about 45-50% power. You did mention that 2350 rpm or less was problematic, so 2400 rpm and about 19" MP will get you 120-125 KIAS or so. That will be about 7 1/2 gph leaned roughly to peak. This information can be gleaned from your POH (1223E, I think), performance pages, Best Economy at 2000 feet. But no one like to interpolate tables, so.... I ran the Benchmark engine model for 2000 feet and 30 deg C for a jaunt around Lake Weir, the temperature was chosen t
    4 points
  7. Owner produced, $5 for 4.
    4 points
  8. What happens in the plane stays in the plane.
    3 points
  9. Removing the yokes is simple, dealing with the wiring for any switches/buttons on the yoke can be problematic. When I did it I removed the wires from the switches and buttons and then reinstalled them afterwards. I've since learned the easier way is to cut the wires where they exit the shaft and pin the wires for a connector. If you need to remove the yokes again, you can then just unplug the connector and remove the pins from the connector body and slide the wires through the shaft.
    3 points
  10. Masks, we don't need no stinking masks..................just kidding! Easy to accommodate by keeping one in each car and each airplane...........they really don't take up much room in the flight bag! Happy Mooney traveling.
    3 points
  11. This is true, except that if there is a dual alternator in a 231 it is an aftermarket alternator, and the event of failure of the backup would not be covered in the main body of the POH because the POH was written before the aftermarket item was installed. It might be in the STC for the backup alternator, of in the flight manual supplement that is supposed to be inserted in the POH, and it might also be in the STC for any mission critical navigation equipment, like a GPS/Nav comm. There would also be the possibility that it would be in the 337 that allowed the backup alternator to be installe
    3 points
  12. Good points all. But I don't do anything in my airplane out of routine or because it's SOP. So for me it's not an unusual procedure. Everything I do is on condition and as needed. I'm not suggesting this is for everyone... but it works for me.
    3 points
  13. While Mooney instrument panels are a challenge to work on, I doubt that many owners say leave half the old system and old wiring behind. Orphaned systems and wiring make an already crammed panel even worse. Clarence
    3 points
  14. No one ever accused me of being tall. And so it would be very uncomfortable and likely difficult for me to get out of the left seat without sliding it back. Often when we travel, my wife will put a bag behind my seat as it's an easy location for her to reach while sitting in the right front seat. She now knows to move it at the top of descent so that on landing I can slide my seat back and exit. If no one is sitting behind me, I'll pull the bar and slide my seat all the way to the back immediately after the prop stops turning. It's then easy to exit the cockpit. Fortunately Mooney h
    2 points
  15. Remember that you said that you are so tall that you have added another aft hole in the seat track and that you can fly it with the seat all the way back against the backseat. Your "normal" seat position is set in the range were the seat is normally released and pushed back. If a pilot is short the seat will be forward perhaps on the first seat track hole. If, after they get in and slide the seat forward to their comfortable position, they then place a board behind the seat - then they will be wedged in and unable to exit until that board is pulled out behind the seat.
    2 points
  16. An STC is a legal change to your type certificate - it most certainly applies including any FAA approved airworthiness limitations.
    2 points
  17. When I had my avionics upgraded, I told my shop to remove all the vacuum related stuff firewall aft. They removed the peanut gauge, wired the vacuum light such that it illuminates when you hit the push to test but it otherwise doesn't illuminate (I may need a placard for this or cover it at some point). And as far as I can tell they removed removed all the vacuum tubes under the panel. However, they left in the vacuum regulator (the one with the garter filter) and another vacuum filter that I'm not sure was even plumbed to anything before the mod. I had to then remove these two items t
    2 points
  18. If you read Lycomings literature, they even state pretty often that engines operated at 65% power or lower will last longer. ‘Ever heard of TANSTAAFL? It’s from one of my favorite Science Fiction writers, it’s “There Ain’t No Such Thing As A Free Lunch” Simply stated it says there are advantages and disadvantages to every single way that you can operate an engine, so pick a way that fits your desires and to Hell with all the supposed experts, most of us fly less than 100 hours per year. my aircraft is 41 years old and has 2200 hours on it, and that’s not all that unusual. Engine was
    2 points
  19. The portion of your BFR that occurs at an airport would be covered; an airport is included in the definition of "transportation hub." People at a flight school operating at an airport would be covered. If you're inside the flight school building, I don't know whether you're technically at the airport. I believe it would not apply during the BFR or check ride if that occurs on your private plane, as that would be a "private conveyance[] operated solely for personal, non-commercial use." This order is clearly aimed at encouraging compliance out of respect for the law rather than encou
    2 points
  20. Well thanks to the beechcraft forum they had a continental fuel injection install pdf that explained very nicely with pictures of how the turbocharged fuel injectors are assembled, thus allowing me to not only understand how to take them apart but also listed the o-ring and rubber washer i needed to order to replace them. Once i replaced them and tested again to verify i did not have any soap bubbles and that sealed the airleak. Also did another fuel pressure test and no leak! Finally! Took it up for a test flight and it’s running smoother than when i bought it. Also TIT was lower in flight a
    2 points
  21. I don't know whether you saw my previous thread. I am 82. Parker could not find any carrier who would offer me hull insurance on my Mooney. Some would give me a policy if I flew a non-retractable plane. Liability policies are available. I wound up buying a liability policy and self insuring the hull.
    2 points
  22. Rick, Could you be kind enough to fill us in on the schedule details for the rest of the Mooney line up? There are many Mooney Owners from M20A-Z that are looking to buy a Dynon auto pilot... They are holding off from buying the GFC that is already available... There are several Dynon Skyview customers around here... Two have posted pics of the empty space where their Dynon AP is schedule to fit... the YouTube Chanel clearly says FlyDynon right on the instrument panel... What could be better than showing how Dynon supports its customers than a schedule of STC rele
    2 points
  23. There is a lot I like about the Dynon product and I really like the Dynon installation approach. Not having a realistic idea on when the autopilot will be available makes it a no-go for me.
    2 points
  24. Because somebody asked how I do it: here is my self-made leaning calculator for the Lycoming IO-360. The outer ring and center are fixed, the ring with the black numbers can be turned. When flying ROP (right side of "RICH"), I use the indicated gph or MORE. When flying LOP (left side of "RICH"), I use the indicated gph or LESS. Keep in mind that 10.1 gph corresponds to 150 HP (in ideal conditions, in the IO-360 at 1:8.7 compression), thus 75% power of the IO-360. Because of that, 10.1 gph or less will NEVER put you inside the "red box", and that is the reason I don't u
    2 points
  25. My how time flies. I came across my link to this forum and thread and thought I'd post "the rest of the story." This oil leak problem occurred in 2016 and never re-appeared, so with the help of the posters we solved the problem. In fact, I flew this plane about 100 hours a year until early 2020 when I sold it. In 2019 I took the plane from Texas to Alaska and back on a month long vacation. The problem never appeared again. My thanks again to all who helped me troubleshoot it, come up with correction options and gave moral support.
    2 points
  26. I FINALLY made it back to the Innovation Studio, (maker space), and have been making switch covers. Please PM me if you need any. For those who have PM'ed me in the past, I think I have already responded directly to everyone, but if I have missed you I apologize.
    2 points
  27. A Tinnerman nut makes a good reinforcement for baffle spring holes. Clarence
    2 points
  28. Ummmm....The Pilot would likely be sliding the pilot seat back if he or she needed to exit the plane in an emergency....
    1 point
  29. I read that the cdc will release post vaccinated guidance this weekend.
    1 point
  30. Check the manual aspect of the switch - in the above picture the micro switch is attached to the bracket with a plunger. If that plunger is stuck or sticky it won't let the microswitch return to its non active state. You may want to check that plunger to make sure its free.
    1 point
  31. You are missing 2 crystals, you are not using the full capability of the radio? I remember as a kid going to hamfests to find cheap crystals for my transmitter.
    1 point
  32. On my 67F (I don't no for the C), the gear down switch is mounted into an pushing rod box with return spring. With the time, it necessary to lubricate the pushing rod. Otherwise, the return spring is not strong enough and the switch does not immediately deliver the information.
    1 point
  33. Toe scuffs tires and leaves a feathered edge. This wear is not toe. this wear is caused by sever under inflation. the concave area where the cords show was flat on the ground. The difference between the inner edge and the outer edge is due to camber.
    1 point
  34. Yes I do. I'll find the info on them in the morning.
    1 point
  35. Sad to hear what is the end to what arguably was the best Mooney speed mod there ever was. I am sure @Piloto has his reasons but seems a shame to end yet another legacy.
    1 point
  36. No one is trying to give you a hard time. It's just that for some reason the trim system on Mooneys gets overlooked a lot and it does need routine lubrication. Often times pilots use the electric trim exclusively and don't know it's getting stiff until it gets so bad that the trim servo gives up. Skip
    1 point
  37. @cliffy, try the included silicone plugs instead of the foam ones. I've been enjoying my Halos since 2009 and absolutely love them. Finally got a second set for my wife to try, and it only took one half-hour local flightseeing trip to convert her.
    1 point
  38. It's thermodynamics. Heat is a form of energy. The turbine extracts heat energy from the exhaust gasses and converts it to mechanical energy to spin the compressor. The effect is that the temperature of the exhaust leaving the turbine will be lower than the turbine inlet temperature. There are, of course, details to actual process by which the energy transfer takes place, and there are additional factors like the kinetic energy of the exhaust gas. But the basic idea of thermodynamic processes is that energy cannot be created or destroyed (First Law) and so the heat energy and mechanical e
    1 point
  39. I used Premier in Ft. Lauderdale. Probably a bit more expensive but very detail oriented.
    1 point
  40. That's all I had in my C140 in 1965!
    1 point
  41. Robert, I didn't cut the CAPE out of this chart. This is a radiosonde observation and they don't include CAPE on RAOBs. But this might help.
    1 point
  42. Take away’s for me since it’s all speculation, let’s mitigate those potential causes in our community. 1. When seat is positioned where you want it—-gently -rock forward then back to FEEL you are hooked. I do this religiously because I had seat slip back when pushed rudder to turn while taxiing. Happy it happened on taxi. 2. Run-up— Exercise the Trim stop to stop. Admittedly I slack here. But not so moving forward. 3. A MS’er /A&P/AI posts pics and guidance on that AD from 2012. Hope all have complied, but again?
    1 point
  43. I mention this before, the price of the Dynon vs G3X is basically the same ...10” full functionality (magnetometer, autopilot, etc) with 130 hours of labor (Dynon estimates are 90-150 hours) is $37,000 assuming $90/hr labor rate. The G3X with G5 and 3 servo GFC 500 would be about the same. You’re not going to save any money unless you can do installation yourself, which is more likely possible with the Dynon. So it’s not a question of price it’s more of a question of which functionality you prefer. Of course if there is no autopilot, that question is easy to answer.
    1 point
  44. Thanks, btw I forgot to include the Littelfuse CG230 gas discharge tube that goes from the 0.22uF capacitor ("sync" input) to ground. This device will trigger (short to ground) once the lower 200uF capacitor has reached 230VDC and dump the charge from the 0.22uF capacitor into the step-up transformer (located in the strobe light assembly) to trigger a flash. The yellow sync leads from all three power supplies (wingtips and tail) are connected together so that whichever supply's CG230 first reaches 230VDC will trigger a flash on all three synchronously. If the yellow sync lead is simp
    1 point
  45. Unless it is really in very bad shape, there are two routes: 1. Send it to Aerocomfort as Anthony @carusoam suggests. Hector will patch it and cover it and it will look very nice. However, doing that from France may be expensive and time consuming. 2. Repair it yourself. This isn't really all that difficult. It is made of ABS plastic. The glareshield is made of two parts. You can remove the underside by working it free with a putty knife and/or long bladed knife inserted between the two parts. Obtain some ABS sheet plastic and repair any damaged flat areas by gluing pieces of sheet
    1 point
  46. No, it was changed as part of a requirement for pilots to have an annual flight review until they reached 100 hours. That was short lived though. -Robert
    1 point
  47. Guy must be a total hack. Good physicians aren't exactly in excess, I doubt strongly any of them would be dismissed just for saying something in public they believed to be true. Actually, this post smells hard.
    1 point
  48. What you're missing is when it's time for you to get your shot, do it. You time will come, likely before summer is up. Do it. The antivaxxers are misinformed, misconstrued, and generally nuts. You don't want COVID. It can wipe you and and cause long-lasting symptoms that can be devastating. Get the vaccine, whichever one they offer you. They all work, and they're all safe. Whatever side effect you get from the vaccine are nothing compared to the 'rona.
    1 point
  49. Actually standing up for others is something I do in real life too. Sometimes its a fault. Sometimes its a virtue. Its not a hobby but in my opinion standing up for people is a moral duty. I am sorry if you see that as a hobby.
    1 point
  50. I gave up last year and put dual G5's in in preparation for the GFC500. My plane goes in the end of April to have that installed. At the time I had AV-30s on order for about 18 months but gave up and halfway into the installation of hte G5's the AV-30s were approved. If that logic holds true then sometime at the end of April or beginning of May when the GFC500 is going in the TruTrack should be approved.
    1 point

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