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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/03/2019 in all areas

  1. What are these sectionals and charts you speak of? Are they new apps? Tom
    9 points
  2. If you can get a repeatable rise when turning the heat on vs off you can be confident of an exhaust leak someplace. I have had many reports of similar small rises (less than 10ppm) that proved to catch issues early. That has been the great part of these high resolution monitors. They have found many problems well before they were dangerous. 5-10ppm is not dangerous from a CO poisoning perspective but it may be an early sign of exhaust trouble. Like I said, if it is repeatable I would take a close look at the exhaust/heating system at your earliest convenience. cheers, Dan
    5 points
  3. My nose wheel cover was shot as well. (It was the only original Royalite part I needed to copy as the rest of my interior was retrofittted from an Ovation). I started with the broken part, used wood, clay, tape and whatever I needed to create the shape I needed. Then started hand laying-up fiberglass over the old part. You lay-up 3 or four layers, then sand as need, then repeat many, many tines until you have a workable part. For the original new part I just used hardware store fiberglass resin. Then, when I had a good finished part, I used that as a mold to make a flame retardant part from flame retardant resin. A picture is attached. All it takes is time, patience, fiberglass and sand paper. (I substituted a J model Trim and flap indicator for the original with a DER approval). John Breda
    4 points
  4. Yes and no... (best fighter pilot line ever: it depends!) As both a Naval Aviator in the F-18 (I flew the A, B, C, D as well as the E/F) and then an IP in the F-15C and now the F-35A.... I would never give up the ability to know my Angle of Attack. But there are differences in the way the instruments are used between a F-15C (which is a mechanical flight control system) and the F-18/F-35... which are both digital, fly by wire flight control systems. in the F-15C- the AoA gauge is calibrated into “units” which are basically a linear scale based on a flight control input and a stabilized output AoA... which means that 1-2 units might mean only a .5 degree true AoA at high air speeds, but could be more than a degree True AoA at low air speeds. As a result- each “unit” wasn’t the same in terms of actual output of performance. “Feel” though- based on buffet cues, allowed for a decent method to find the lift limit of the aircraft without referencing a set AoA... which based on the probes- varied in accuracy at the upper ends of the envelope, and didn’t necessarily give a linear response past the lift limit. Don’t get me wrong though- I still referenced AoA all the time- it just wasn’t quite to the same level as the digital fly by wire jets. So that’s why I say that he was kind of right. Because with his aircraft, he didn’t have an AoA gauge that would have been able to help him in a dogfight (but certainly if the technology was better- it would/could have)! In a digital fly by wire jet- the flight control computers allow for precise control of a commanded true AoA. So you literally set an AoA... and by knowing the EM diagram (edit: EM stands for Energy-Maneuverability- it’s a chart that shows energy bleed rates versus a commanded AoA based on thrust, weight and altitude... something we study) of the aircraft- the pilot knows exactly how well his/her aircraft is performing. It is critical. for reference- all four of those aircraft display the angle of attack in the HUD (or virtual hud in the F-35) and also in the JHMCS (joint helmet mounted cueing system). and in all four of those aircraft, you also use AoA for all landings (as opposed to airspeeds), which once mastered, allows for the shortest rollouts and best touchdown Landing zone control. Oh- and he was definitely being a curmudgeon!
    4 points
  5. Come on, you totally forgot the King AeroCruze 230.... er, never mind, sorry.
    3 points
  6. If you place freshly greased bearings into the wheel, then fill the space between the bearing and the felt seal assembly with grease, you will never have water intrusion. On the other hand, we have many Cirrus with molded seals operating in dirty environments like the Bahamas, and the molded seals wear faster due to the sand getting on them. The seals are harder, so the sand cuts into the aluminum hub spacers. Properly greased felt assemblies outlast the "new improved" parts in this application.
    3 points
  7. That fuel gauge looks like a direct mechanical gauge. Over time the air in the line (which acts to dampen pump pulses)from the fuel servo to the gauge is replaced by fuel. You can open the line at both ends and blow the fuel out then reconnect and see if it helps. As Rich points out air entry before the pump also happens, you can dribble a little 100 Wright oil down the fuel selector shaft to see if it temporarily seals the O ring. If it does help the O ring requires replacement. Clarence
    3 points
  8. I use an EFB, so I am no help when it comes to charts. However, I laminated my checklists and they live tucked in the plastic trim just above the window. I circled it in the picture below. It keeps it in easy reach.
    3 points
  9. I had to fly with a bunch of brand B, but they were ok guys. fortunately for me, my safety pilot knew Mooney formation stuff pretty well. I was lucky enough to have Chuck Crinnian ride right seat. I got signed off for solo, and we flew a simulated mass flight from DVT to GYR. 12 ships, flight there was 2 ship with a trailing 3rd and the flight back was 3 ship. We landed in formation at GYR and then one after the other at DVT. What a great experience! My arms are tired, I think I about wore out my rudder pedals, but it was so much fun! I’m lucky enough that my wife loves to fly and she came along for the flight this morning. Here’s some pictures and videos. C7063441-24DE-4F9A-8E2F-24D1E142D3D3.MOV
    2 points
  10. Here is a link to the install manual on my site. It should be very similar to this. https://img1.wsimg.com/blobby/go/67ffe437-954b-48ce-b81a-78c599cefe78/downloads/1cnsgjvr6_746127.pdf I also have all the install manuals posted here for the currently approved airframes: https://wolfaviationsales.com/trutrak-autopilots#97de52d9-c555-4987-bafd-881053549dc9
    2 points
  11. Wow - well I think you may essentially be optimizing some functional related to performance in your head - doing local adjustments to benefit a global optimum performance objective. Doing this analytically is done by calculus of variations and it is a foundation of optimal control (and also underlies mechanics). So then it yields an "Euler-Lagrange" equation which is a differential equation whose solution is that optimal path. ...I think (I'm guessing) you may well be using a local observation (lift reserve) to optimize path - whether you need to think in those terms or not - but if a computer does this for you, then that is how I would approach the problem of designing the algorithm. Or maybe I have over interpreted this whole thing in a way that is interesting to me.
    2 points
  12. It’s hard to believe that the seals are worth more than the wheel bearings! Clarence
    2 points
  13. Guys, I can't argue with X-plane and I've heard it's good. I was too invested in MSFS to change. Since I started flying in '97 (MS95?) I've tried to get a copy of any new plane I've flown, customise as much as I could, and check the basics. Certainly helps with rough numbers and panel layouts etc. Because I was tied to the MSFS world I jumped over to Prepare3D from Lockheed. It is very good and getting better, and I got to keep all my work. For anyone flying Garmin GNS or GTS I can't recommend RealityXP : http://www.reality-xp.com/ too highly - they have an Xplane version as well. Since we bought OVH I've put a bit of extra work to get the sim model as close as I can. This model is a stock P3D Acclaim modified with Mindstar G1000 and RealNAv data, custom performance data and custom textures. As real as it gets ? When the weather is really ordinary I just put in some IFR time at home. Practicing button pushing on the ground in the sim is a lot cheaper than burning gas. The instruments and add on GPS simulators are very good now. My full setup is probably less than 2 AMUs. The real trick is not to geek out too much and make sure you fly rather than fiddling with your set up - a challenge I occasionally fail!
    2 points
  14. And now ebay. https://www.ebay.com/itm/MOONEY-CHAPARRAL-M20E-1969-1600TTAF/173818740240?hash=item2878677e10:g:w0sAAOSw8xxcepgm
    2 points
  15. It is my understanding that the plane is test flown with the stall strips taped on the wing. Then dependent on its stall characteristics, they move the stall strips around until it stalls straight ahead. The stall strips are then fixed in the proper place. Since that involves screw holes, I have a hard time believing a paint shop could or would install them in a different place.
    2 points
  16. Paying close attention to a very sensitive monitor that reads down to 1ppm and was designed for industrial but not aviation use has its own liabilities. The very low readouts were not meant to have useful positive predictive value of a muffler leak or other threatening problem in the context they are being used. What percent of us fly around with levels in the 5-10ppm range without any imminent issue that requires action (and without a monitor that reads down to 1ppm to tell us about it)? I don't know, but I did note that none the none of the purpose-built certified monitors from Guardian Avionics will even display a reading below 10ppm, which led me to select a less sensitive monitor. Could the intermittent 5-10ppm reading in cruise with heat on be the earliest indication of a deteriorating muffler? Certainly, but I suspect a high false positive rate for predicting that, and inspecting the muffler meticulously now may not be worth the hassle and risk of new maintenance-induced issues. I would take a quick look at the exhaust, heating ducts, and firewall now but probably wait until annual to pull the muffler shroud, unless the monitor develops progressively higher readings over time.
    2 points
  17. You’re irritated because the certification date slipped and you already spent the AP budget on other things? I’m confused the cost is the same at less than half the price of an stec 30 as it was 6 months ago.
    1 point
  18. Does anyone know the harness specifications needed for the TruTrak install? I couldn't find it in their docs. I'm down for annual and have everything opened up and accessible. It would be a great time to run some wire bundles. (I've done a TruTrack on a RV9A in the past so that provides some guidance but it may vary a bit...) Any details would be appreciated. Robert
    1 point
  19. Nope! There are zero approved M20s. That link states that...GFC 500 Certification Programs Planned to Begin in the Next 12-months: Mooney M20 Models: M20, A, B, C, D, E, F,
    1 point
  20. EGT spread is not important. The peak spread is what should be of concern.
    1 point
  21. Wow! You text like a milleneal in that second video. Very impressive.
    1 point
  22. The IO550(g) is capable of a 0.1gph Gami spread... any tighter than that, I would need a more accurate FF gauge to know it... A 1 gph Gami spread is really wide, probably indicating some blockage in a FI or something unusual... Keep in mind my numbers are based on the personal experience of only one IO550g that was running incredibly well... Pp thoughts only, not a mechanic... Best regards, -a-
    1 point
  23. It’s as varied as any subject. As an example, I take care of a Piper Arrow that had a left wing replaced with a new one years ago, as opposed to a repair of the spar. To me it’s a parts replacement not damage history. Clarence
    1 point
  24. While the onus is on the operator/ pilot before flight, it seems odd to carry out enforcement action against the maintainer who may miss some obscure AD when the owner should be responsible for ensuring compliance. Clarence
    1 point
  25. Fuel pressure oscillation is the most unsettling of all things... (PP opinion...) This is something to put in front of @M20Doc for input... Looks like the mechanical pump is being challenged to make pressure... it either is not producing enough pressure, or it could be leaking pressure that it built... It is good to see the electrical pump being able to do its job properly... Best regards, -a-
    1 point
  26. Yes- exactly- that’s the best/only way to ensure that my jet is “max performing”: scribing either the fastest turn, or the smallest radius through the sky.
    1 point
  27. Ain't no way I'd go back to folding paper charts in an airplane. I have a large tablet on a knee pad and a smaller one on the yoke. Using both together provides both redundancy and a lot of flexibility, e.g., the approach plates go on the yoke while the map is still up on the knee. I find this far, far easier than charts, and I can zoom an EFB to read lettering that I would fumble with on a paper chart. Plus my paper charts didn't work to tap on the airport to get more info or tap on a region to get winds aloft or wx or whatever. I've tried it before and it didn't work. Maybe the batteries were dead but I couldn't figure out how to change them.
    1 point
  28. I would look at the fuel selector. Did you switch tanks when this happened? BTW, the pump is in the engine manual.
    1 point
  29. This one here- Comant Nav Antenna I mis-spoke when I said “modern”... I meant only that it doesn’t have an external balun.
    1 point
  30. Kinda defeats the purpose doesn’t it?
    1 point
  31. Just curious why you want all of that? brian
    1 point
  32. There are a number of settings in addition to the angle to help with light and other filming artifacts. I would just load up the app and play with them on a flight to see which group of settings give you the look you are looking for. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro
    1 point
  33. Flight suits and race suits are very different. I know this partly because once in a while somebody tries to (or at least asks about) using a nomex flight suit for a race. They don't meet the requirements, and race suits generally aren't very comfortable when worn for long periods (e.g., they're kinda hot). They also don't have very many pockets, which most flight suits do. You don't write a lot of stuff down or dig out a chart during a race.
    1 point
  34. Here it is. I'm not sure how well the picture translates but it's bright.
    1 point
  35. $165/hr for their F model is a steal compared to the overall actual cost of my D. “If it flies, floats, or fornicates, then it’s cheaper to rent...” Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    1 point
  36. The problem is not that you have 5-10 ppm of CO. That is harmless. The problem is that you have an exhaust leak into your heater system. How long will that small hole stay small? What are you willing to gamble on that?
    1 point
  37. Most of the work and hours a new IA will do to your plane if they have not seen it is the AD Research work. This is a good 8-20 hours of work it's not really creating value for you, but they have to do it prior to putting their name on the line. A good IA that knows the problem areas to inspect is just as good as an MSC. I think it is better approach to created focus areas to inspect each year and go through each system thoroughly instead of trying to take the whole plane apart and put it back together.
    1 point
  38. Great question... The answer to some simple questions can be incredibly complex, and vary depending on the area of the world you are in... The more you can observe other Mooney pilots... the more you can pick up some of the quirky things that have been proven to work... Or learn things like... Don’t leave the tow bar in the nose wheel... leave the ignition key on the glare shield... always walk around the plane observing, one more time before getting in the plane... Flows and Checklists are used by the most experienced Mooney pilots... GUMPS, GUMPS, GUMPS.... These are some of things that ordinary people have a tendency to do... until they realize the brain ordinarily makes errors and these particular errors can be really costly... PP thoughts, keep asking questions... Best regards, -a-
    1 point
  39. Bombard Trek Lawler with emails, until he visits MS more often.... @TrekLawler Trek is the usual Garmin contact that has social media as part of his responsibility... Best regards, -a-
    1 point
  40. https://www.aircraftspruce.com/catalog/avpages/rami15-97-6.php?gclid=CjwKCAiA8OjjBRB4EiwAMZe6y5HxpUl0lXvy1jcl3wxO926J_2JPumJdlQ8BMWCpUHuIS8Lfamxj5BoC-m0QAvD_BwE
    1 point
  41. I’m still using a GSM remote switch that runs on T-Mobile’s “Pay as you go” plan ($3/mth). I use a relay switch to control the power for a small ceramic heater. I don’t trust these cheap GSM switches to carry full amperage through them. This is the relay I use I took an old power supply from a cell phone and ran the +/- leads to the green connector on the relay. I plug the power supply into one of the GSM switch ports and trigger it that way. The GSM switch uses a simple text message string to activate it. You can also use a white list to restrict phone numbers that can call it. DO NOT use the SwitchBox one sold out there. Unless they have fixed the way they carry power, they added extra solder on the traces in an attempt to carry more juice than the box is designed for. I have pictures of this and assurances from EEs that I work with that this is a dangerous practice. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    1 point
  42. Not at all a dumb question, or one with a simple answer. This issue has been much debated here and elsewhere. No definitive answer. Best takeaways I can give: -Probably not a good idea for an oil sump alone heater - may produce temp gradients that promote condensation on the top of the engine -A legit consideration for a strong heater for both cylinders and oil sump, which heats the engine more uniformly (e.g. Reiff turbo XP). As long as the whole engine stays above the dew point temp all the time, it should be helpful from a condensation moisture perspective. -One might worry that the hotter engine temp in storage might also harm parts like cam and tappets by causing protective oil to be less viscous and run off. FWIW, I decided to leave it plugged in all winter this year but try hard to get it in the air once every two weeks at least, have only failed once so far.
    1 point
  43. If money is no object- a MSC is not a bad idea. if you’ve got an A&P IA that you trust implicitly, that knows your plane inside and out- then their is little reason to stray IMO. Some say their is benefit in a fresh set of eyes. That would be the primary benefit of having a MSC take a look- but it will most likely cost you. I used LASAR a few times under the previous ownership. Ok service, knowledgeable A&P’s, inconvenient to get to, very expensive rates (compared to my other shop experiences). i used the MSC at Chandler this year, and the rates there were in line with LASAR’s rates, and had a very similar experience for annual. Knowledgeable, good work, but expensive.
    1 point
  44. That's getting up there. Go to Downloads on the homepage, there are lots of books there. A more recent one should have more information.
    1 point
  45. Well thank you Alex! Its sort of a chameleon color, that looks very different in various light conditions. Sometimes deep blue, sometimes lighter blue or purple, sometimes almost black. And there is a sparkle substance in the mid-clear coat, not the pearl that is in the paint, but micro-glass bead balls, that really bling in the direct sunshine, like a bass boat treatment. Anyway, thank you!
    1 point
  46. Have you tried downloading updated nav data from navigraph? It should update the 430 in the Mooney. Great point on connecting iPad to the sim for moving map. X-Plane will interface with all EFB apps that have a sim mode (iFly, ForeFlight, Garmin Pilot) so you can really try out your skills using the same tools you may use in the cockpit. I also forgot to mention that X-Plane will interface with several apps that will generate flight instruments / EFIS for ease of reference and interface with the sim. For example, AirFMC, Avioware, and Air Manager.
    1 point
  47. When and where did you experience this issue? I think the navy has been doing some GPS jamming on the eastern side and the Caribbean. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    1 point
  48. I just added Part 2: Eastbound to the original post
    1 point
  49. Try giving Garmin support a call. I hear they are pretty helpful. Once you get ADS-B working, you'll love it.
    1 point


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